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Amos Wako
Anglo Leasing
Anti-Corruption Commission
Central Bank of Kenya
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Gideon Rukaria
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Anglo Leasing investigator summoned to court Tuesday

An investigator with the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC), Gideon Rukaria, has been ordered to appear in court Tuesday to shed light on Anglo Leasing contracts after his absence stalled the case once again. Senior Principal Magistrate Martha Mutuku Monday summoned Mr Rukaria, who was top investigator in the Anglo Leasing contracts, whom the court heard had been transferred to Machakos.“I direct that Mr Rukaria continues with his testimony tomorrow, before we can proceed to call another witness,” Ms Mutuku said.

Mr Rukaria is to testify in a suit where businessmen and senior government officials have been charged with corruption over the multibillion-shilling Anglo-Leasing contracts of 2003 which the government later cancelled.The cross-examination of Mr Rukaria will centre on EACC’s investigation on the security contracts in a probe that the Attorney General’s office had earlier said had gaps.The gaps highlighted in former Attorney-General Amos Wako’s report included lack of evidence indicating that Parliament was not consulted over the Anglo Leasing contracts and lack of budget allocation for security items.Mr Wako said that there was no formal statement from the Central Bank of Kenya and the Treasury.He had demanded a report from the head of procurement on ministers’ role in the purchase.The AG also called for the replacement of some prosecution witnesses, arguing that they may turn hostile to the court because they faced charges in other Anglo Leasing contracts.The separate EACC investigations report indicates that the security kits linked to the scam were delivered at Kenya Police and that the government was yet to pay for them. In October this year, the Office of Director of Public Prosecutions lost the bid to stop the use of the Wako brief in court. A previous case fell apart in 2005 because of lack of evidence.

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